Meet the Team

Impact Evaluation

 
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Mark G. Shrime, MD, MPH, PhD, FACS

Director, Center for Global Surgery Evaluation

Mark G. Shrime, MD, MPH, PhD, FACS, is the founder and Director of the Center for Global Surgery Evaluation at the  Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary , an Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology and of Global Health and Social Medicine at the Harvard Medical School, and a Visiting Research Scholar at Princeton University’s  Center for Health and Wellbeing .  He is the author of seminal papers on the  global burden of surgical disease , the  financial burden facing surgical patients , and the number of people who  cannot access safe surgery worldwide . He served as a co-author on the  Lancet Commission on Global Surgery .  Dr. Shrime graduated summa cum laude from Princeton University in 1996 with a BA in molecular biology. He received his MD from the University of Texas in 2001, after taking a year to teach organic chemistry in Singapore. Medical school was followed by a residency in otolaryngology at the joint Columbia/Cornell program in Manhattan, followed, in turn, by a fellowship in head and neck surgical oncology at the University of Toronto in 2007. He completed a second fellowship in microvascular reconstructive surgery, also at the University of Toronto, in 2008. He was the first to identify a novel independent prognostic indicator in head and neck cancer.  To date, he has worked and taught in Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea, Benin, Togo, Congo, Haiti, Saudi Arabia, Cameroon, and Madagascar. In May, 2011, he graduated with an MPH in global health from the Harvard School of Public Health, where he was a finalist for both the Albert Schweitzer award and the HSPH Student Recognition award, and in May, 2015, he received his PhD in health policy from Harvard University, with a concentration in decision science. His research is supported by the  Damon Runyon Cancer Foundation  and  Mercy Ships ; he has previously received research support from the  GE Foundation’s Safe Surgery 2020 project  and the  Steven C. and Carmella Kletjian Foundation .  His academic pursuits focus on surgical delivery in low- and middle-income countries, where he has a specific interest in the intersection of health and impoverishment. His work aims to determine optimal policies and platforms for surgical delivery that maximize health benefits while simultaneously minimizing the risk of financial catastrophe faced by patients. In 2018, he was awarded the  Arnold P. Gold Humanism in Medicine Award  by the American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery.  When not working, he is an avid photographer and rock climber, and has competed on Seasons 8 and 9 of   American Ninja Warrior  .

Mark G. Shrime, MD, MPH, PhD, FACS, is the founder and Director of the Center for Global Surgery Evaluation at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, an Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology and of Global Health and Social Medicine at the Harvard Medical School, and a Visiting Research Scholar at Princeton University’s Center for Health and Wellbeing.

He is the author of seminal papers on the global burden of surgical disease, the financial burden facing surgical patients, and the number of people who cannot access safe surgery worldwide. He served as a co-author on the Lancet Commission on Global Surgery.

Dr. Shrime graduated summa cum laude from Princeton University in 1996 with a BA in molecular biology. He received his MD from the University of Texas in 2001, after taking a year to teach organic chemistry in Singapore. Medical school was followed by a residency in otolaryngology at the joint Columbia/Cornell program in Manhattan, followed, in turn, by a fellowship in head and neck surgical oncology at the University of Toronto in 2007. He completed a second fellowship in microvascular reconstructive surgery, also at the University of Toronto, in 2008. He was the first to identify a novel independent prognostic indicator in head and neck cancer.

To date, he has worked and taught in Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea, Benin, Togo, Congo, Haiti, Saudi Arabia, Cameroon, and Madagascar. In May, 2011, he graduated with an MPH in global health from the Harvard School of Public Health, where he was a finalist for both the Albert Schweitzer award and the HSPH Student Recognition award, and in May, 2015, he received his PhD in health policy from Harvard University, with a concentration in decision science. His research is supported by the Damon Runyon Cancer Foundation and Mercy Ships; he has previously received research support from the GE Foundation’s Safe Surgery 2020 project and the Steven C. and Carmella Kletjian Foundation.

His academic pursuits focus on surgical delivery in low- and middle-income countries, where he has a specific interest in the intersection of health and impoverishment. His work aims to determine optimal policies and platforms for surgical delivery that maximize health benefits while simultaneously minimizing the risk of financial catastrophe faced by patients. In 2018, he was awarded the Arnold P. Gold Humanism in Medicine Award by the American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery.

When not working, he is an avid photographer and rock climber, and has competed on Seasons 8 and 9 of American Ninja Warrior.

 
 
 

Blake Alkire, MD, MPH

Assistant Director, Center for Global Surgery Evaluation

Blake Alkire is an attending Otolaryngologist at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and a faculty member at the Program in Global Surgery and Social Change (PGSSC) at Harvard Medical School. His original interest in global surgery stemmed from annual medical service trips to Ecuador with his father, an orthopedic surgeon. He originally joined the PGSSC in 2010 as a medical student, performing on the ground research in Haiti with Partners in Health after the 2010 earthquake. Over the past 8 years, his research has focused on developing models to assess the economic cost and benefit of surgical interventions in low and middle-income countries. In addition to contributing original economic research as a chapter to the Disease Control Priorities Surgery Volume, he led the modelling for two of the five key messages for the Lancet commission on Global Surgery. More recently, he led an economic analysis on amenable mortality that was published in Health Affairs and featured in the Lancet Commission on High Quality Health Systems. His ongoing interests include working with the World Bank to establish sustainable, innovative financing mechanisms for scaling up global surgery and advocating for improved surgical indicator collection at the United Nations and WHO.  Blake, born and raised in Texas, received an undergraduate degree from Vanderbilt University, an M.D. from Harvard Medical School, and an M.P.H. with a concentration in global health from the Harvard School of Public Health.

Blake Alkire is an attending Otolaryngologist at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and a faculty member at the Program in Global Surgery and Social Change (PGSSC) at Harvard Medical School. His original interest in global surgery stemmed from annual medical service trips to Ecuador with his father, an orthopedic surgeon. He originally joined the PGSSC in 2010 as a medical student, performing on the ground research in Haiti with Partners in Health after the 2010 earthquake. Over the past 8 years, his research has focused on developing models to assess the economic cost and benefit of surgical interventions in low and middle-income countries. In addition to contributing original economic research as a chapter to the Disease Control Priorities Surgery Volume, he led the modelling for two of the five key messages for the Lancet commission on Global Surgery. More recently, he led an economic analysis on amenable mortality that was published in Health Affairs and featured in the Lancet Commission on High Quality Health Systems. His ongoing interests include working with the World Bank to establish sustainable, innovative financing mechanisms for scaling up global surgery and advocating for improved surgical indicator collection at the United Nations and WHO.

Blake, born and raised in Texas, received an undergraduate degree from Vanderbilt University, an M.D. from Harvard Medical School, and an M.P.H. with a concentration in global health from the Harvard School of Public Health.

 

Leah Moody, MPH

Program Manager, Center for Global Surgery Evaluation

Leah is a graduate of Ohio State University where she completed specializations in healthcare policy and global health. During her academic coursework and graduate practicum in Ethiopia, she saw the importance of conducting evaluation research to analyze the outcomes of public health interventions to ensure they are in fact efficacious and positively impacting the populations they serve. Prior to working for CGSE, Leah was a public health program planner for local minority populations in Columbus, Ohio to increase access to healthcare, specifically for families and individuals with immigrant or refugee status. As an aspiring physician herself, Leah looks forward to focusing on a holistic systems approach towards achieving universal healthcare. She enjoys the community building element of working for the Center for Global Surgery Evaluation and credits her Persian grandfather for opening up the worlds of science and poetry to her horizons.

Leah is a graduate of Ohio State University where she completed specializations in healthcare policy and global health. During her academic coursework and graduate practicum in Ethiopia, she saw the importance of conducting evaluation research to analyze the outcomes of public health interventions to ensure they are in fact efficacious and positively impacting the populations they serve. Prior to working for CGSE, Leah was a public health program planner for local minority populations in Columbus, Ohio to increase access to healthcare, specifically for families and individuals with immigrant or refugee status. As an aspiring physician herself, Leah looks forward to focusing on a holistic systems approach towards achieving universal healthcare. She enjoys the community building element of working for the Center for Global Surgery Evaluation and credits her Persian grandfather for opening up the worlds of science and poetry to her horizons.